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Baltimore police leader pleads guilty to racketeering

Recently, the leader of Baltimore’s Gun Trace Task Force pleaded guilty to charges of corruption, including racketeering. In addition, he admitted to stealing dirt-bikes and reselling prescription drugs that were stolen during the 2015 riots.

The former police sergeant confessed that he stole hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash and drugs and worked with a partner to resell marijuana and cocaine.

Furthermore, he participated in a practice that police officers call “sneak and peak” where he followed people he suspected of having money and then entered these individuals’ property to see what was on the premises.

The disgraced police officer is currently in jail and facing a prison sentence anywhere between 20 to 30 years.

The former sergeant’s plea agreement includes details about deep seeded and rampant corruption in the Baltimore Police Department.

Hundreds of cases dropped

As a result of these revelations, the court has dropped hundreds of cases that arose due to rogue police activity, and it seems that thousands of other cases that rely on testimony from the officers involved in the scandal are also compromised.

In addition, the civil court is dealing with dozens of cases from people who found themselves wrongly imprisoned.

Justice on the way?

This situation is an example of the police abusing their position and power and innocent people paying the price. Fortunately, for some people, justice is on the horizon. Not only will the court drop the erroneous charges, but the officers involved in many of these cases might end up in jail instead.

While you may not be a victim of police misconduct, it is important to remember that you can still build a defense for any criminal charges you might face. With the right legal team, you can fight back against criminal charges and possibly avoid a conviction.